Second International Engineering Systems Symposium

 
 

Engineering Systems: Achievements and Challenges

June 15-17, 2009 at MIT

Speaker and Moderator Biographies

Luis A. N. Amaral
Norman R. Augustine
Duncan A. Campbell
James A. Champy
John Clarkson
Denis Cortese
Olivier de Weck
John Doyle
Paulo Ferrão
Paul S. Fischbeck
Arthur Gelb
Mary L. Good
Daniel Hastings

Manuel Heitor
Paulien Minke Herder

Susan Hockfield

Roy Kalawsky
Steven Koonin
Daniel Krob
David H. Lehman
Christopher L. Magee
Joel Moses
Yoshiaki Ohkami
Elisabeth Paté-Cornell
Thomas W. Peterson
John Reed

Daniel Roos
William Rouse
Stan Settles
Yossi Sheffi

Robert E. Skinner, Jr.
Henk G. Sol
Heinz Stoewer
Subra Suresh
Francisco Veloso
Charles M. Vest
Dinesh Verma
Chelsea C. White
Irving Wladawsky-Berger

 

Days 1 & 2 Speaker and Moderator Biographies


Luis A. N. Amaral

speaker photoLuis A. N. Amaral is Associate Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois.

His research is directed towards developing models that provide insight into the emergence, evolution, and stability of complex systems. To this end he develops and validates models that can be studied by means of computational experiments. His approach focuses on the identification of the mechanisms determining the dynamics of a given system. He translates these mechanisms into a parsimonious set of rules that can be implemented and investigated by computational means.

Some of his recent publications include "The worldwide air transportation network: Anomalous centrality, community structure, and cities' global roles" published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, with co-authors R. Guimerà,, S. Mossa, and A. Turtschi, A.(2005); and "Team assembly mechanisms determine collaboration network structure and team performance” in Science, with co-authors R. Guimerà, B. Uzzi, and J. Spiro (2005).

Prof. Amaral received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. from the Universidade de Lisboa in Portugal, and his Ph.D. from Boston University.

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Norman R. Augustine

speaker photoKeynote speaker Norman R. Augustine was raised in Colorado and attended Princeton University where he graduated with a BSE in Aeronautical Engineering, magna cum laude, and an MSE. He was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, Tau Beta Pi and Sigma Xi.

In 1958 he joined the Douglas Aircraft Company in California where he worked as a Research Engineer, Program Manager and Chief Engineer. Beginning in 1965, he served in the Office of the Secretary of Defense as Assistant Director of Defense Research and Engineering. He joined LTV Missiles and Space Company in 1970, serving as Vice President, Advanced Programs and Marketing. In 1973 he returned to the government as Assistant Secretary of the Army and in 1975 became Under Secretary of the Army, and later Acting Secretary of the Army. Joining Martin Marietta Corporation in 1977 as Vice President of Technical Operations, he was elected as CEO in 1987 and chairman in 1988, having previously been President and COO. He served as president of Lockheed Martin Corporation upon the formation of that company in 1995, and became CEO later that year. He retired as chairman and CEO of Lockheed Martin in August 1997, at which time he became a Lecturer with the Rank of Professor on the faculty of Princeton University where he served until July 1999.

Mr. Augustine was Chairman and Principal Officer of the American Red Cross for nine years, Chairman of the National Academy of Engineering, President and Chairman of the Association of the United States Army, Chairman of the Aerospace Industries Association, and Chairman of the Defense Science Board. He is a former President of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the Boy Scouts of America and has served on many Boards of Directors. He is a Regent of the University System of Maryland, Trustee Emeritus of Johns Hopkins and a former member of the Board of Trustees of Princeton and MIT. He is a member of the Advisory Board to the Department of Homeland Security, was a member of the Hart/Rudman Commission on National Security, and has served for 16 years on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. He is a member of the American Philosophical Society and the Council on Foreign Affairs, and is a Fellow of the National Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Explorers Club.

Mr. Augustine has been presented the National Medal of Technology by the President of the United States and received the Joint Chiefs of Staff Distinguished Public Service Award. He has five times received the Department of Defense's highest civilian decoration, the Distinguished Service Medal. He is co-author of The Defense Revolution and Shakespeare In Charge and author of Augustine's Laws and Augustine’s Travels. He holds 23 honorary degrees and was selected by Who’s Who in America and the Library of Congress as one of “Fifty Great Americans” on the occasion of Who’s Who’s fiftieth anniversary.

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Duncan A. Campbell

speaker photoDuncan A. Campbell completed his undergraduate education in Mathematics and Physics, and Electrical and Electronic Engineering in 1985. He completed his PhD on electroencephalogram spike detection using adaptive modelling and neuro-fuzzy techniques at La Trobe University (Melbourne, Australia). He commenced his appointment at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in the year 2000 with the School of Electrical and Electronic Systems Engineering. In 2005, the new School of Engineering Systems was formed from the previous Schools of Electrical and Electronic Systems Engineering, and Mechanical, Medical and Manufacturing Engineering. He holds the role of Alternate Head of School and is part of the leadership team pursuing a vision of engineering applied with a greater social awareness and context.

He is a member of the Australian Research Centre for Aerospace Automation (ARCAA) and is the Robotics and Automation Team Leader with the Faculty of Built Environment and Engineering Smart Systems Research Theme. His research is in the area of computational intelligence with a particular emphasis on real-time systems. He frequently works with industry on process control and automation related projects. Currently, his research includes multi-criteria decision support in autonomous airbourne vehicles (UAVs/UASs) with the overall aim of implementing autonomous human-like decision-making on-board.

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James A. Champy

moderator photoJames A. Champy is chairman of Perot Systems' consulting practice and head of strategy for the company. Mr. Champy is a leading authority on the management issues surrounding business reengineering, organizational change and corporate renewal. He consults extensively with senior-level executives of multinational companies seeking to improve business performance. His approach centers on helping leaders achieve business results through four distinct, yet overlapping areas – business strategy, management and operations, organizational development and change, and information technology. He is co-author of Reengineering the Corporation, a New York Times best-seller for more than a year; as well as Reengineering Management, and co-author of The Arc of Ambition. Mr. Champy collaborated with Harvard Business School Professor Nitin Nohria, for the book Fast Forward, which is a compilation of significant Harvard Business Review articles on change. Mr. Champy's latest book is X-engineering the Corporation, Reinventing Your Business in the Digital Age.

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John Clarkson

speaker photoJohn Clarkson is Professor of Engineering Design and Director, Cambridge Engineering Design Centre at Cambridge University. Prof. Clarkson earned his B.A in Engineering (Electrical Sciences) and his Ph.D. in Engineering (Electrical Machines), both from Cambridge University.

John Clarkson returned to the department in 1995 following a seven-year spell with PA Consulting Group's Technology Division where he was Manager of the Advanced Process Group. He was appointed director of the Engineering Design Centre in 1997 and a University Professor in 2004. John is directly involved in the teaching of design at all levels of the undergraduate course


At PA John gained wide experience of product development with a particular focus on the design of medical equipment and high-integrity systems, where clients required a risk-based systems approach to design to ensure timely delivery of safe systems.

His research interests are in the general area of engineering design, particularly the development of design methodologies to address specific design issues, for example, process management, change management, healthcare design and inclusive design. As well as publishing over 400 papers, he has written a number of books on medical equipment design and inclusive design.

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Denis Cortese

speaker photoDr. Denis Cortese is President and Chief Executive Officer of Mayo Clinic. He chairs the Mayo Clinic Board of Governors. He has been a member of the Board of Trustees since 1997, and previously served on that Board from 1990-1993.

Dr. Cortese is a graduate of Temple University Medical School and completed his residency training in Internal Medicine and Pulmonary Diseases at Mayo Clinic. After service in the U.S. Navy he joined the Mayo Clinic staff in late 1976. He is a professor of medicine and was director of the Pulmonary Disease subspecialty training program from 1979-1987 receiving the teacher of the year award in two of those years.

He was a chair of the Clinical Practice and a member of the Board of Governors in Rochester before moving to Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1993. From 1999-2002 he served as CEO of the Mayo Clinic and Chair of the Board of Directors at St. Luke’s Hospital, both in Jacksonville. Major research interests have been in interventional bronchoscopy including the appropriate use of photodynamic therapy, endobronchial laser therapy and endobronchial stents.

He is a former president of the International Photodynamic Association. His current memberships and honors include the Institute of Medicine of The National Academy of Sciences (US); Chair of the Institute of Medicine’s Roundtable on Evidence Based Medicine; Healthcare Leadership Council and chair for 2007-2009; Harvard/Kennedy School of Healthcare Policy Group; Academia Nacional de Medicina ( Mexico); Royal College of Physicians (London); FRESH-Thinking (Focused Research on Efficient, Secure Healthcare); Advisory Board, World Community Grid; Chairs/Presidents/CEOs Council, American Medical Group Association; Ellis Award, 2007; and the Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences (DEPS) Advisory Committee, National Research Council (NRC), 2008-2010.

Former memberships include the Council on Corporate Competitiveness; Principals Committee, National Innovation Initiative; Center for Corporate Innovation; Steering Committee, RAND Ix Project, “Using Information Technology to Create a New Future in Healthcare.”

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Olivier de Weck

speaker photoOlivier de Weck is Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Engineering Systems and the Associate Director of the Engineering Systems Division at MIT. He was born in Switzerland and holds degrees in industrial engineering from ETH Zurich (1993) and aerospace systems engineering from MIT (2001). Before joining MIT he was a liaison engineer and later engineering program manager on the F/A-18 aircraft program at McDonnell Douglas (1993-1997).

His research interests, teaching emphasis and professional experience is mainly in two areas: systems engineering for changeability and commonality; and space exploration logistics.

Prof. de Weck is an Associate Fellow of AIAA, winner of the 2006 Frank E. Perkins award for excellence in graduate advising and recipient of the 2007 AIAA MDO TC outstanding service award. He won two best paper awards at the 2004 INCOSE Systems Engineering Conference, held the Robert Noyce Career Development Professorship from 2002-2005, and co-advised the best MIT System Design and Management thesis in 2005. He has over 100 journal and conference publications in the area of systems engineering and space systems design for exploration and communications. His research has been funded by GM, NASA, BP, JPL, ArvinMeritor, DARPA/AFRL and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Prof. de Weck is a member of the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) and the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE). He served as the General Chair for the 2nd AIAA MDO Specialist Conference in May 2006. He serves as a faculty mentor to a number of student teams.

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John Doyle

speaker photoJohn Doyle is an expert in theoretical foundations for complex networks in engineering and biology. He is the John G Braun Professor of Control and Dynamical Systems, Electrical Engineering, and Bioengineering at the California Institute of Technology. His research interests include integrating modeling, ID, analysis and design of uncertain nonlinear systems, with applications throughout the aerospace and process control industries. Applications interests are motivated by the interplay between control, dynamical systems, and design and analysis of large, complex engineering systems. Computation in analysis and simulation, including complexity theory to guide algorithm development.

Prof. Doyle earned his BS and MS in electrical engineering from MIT, and his Ph.D. in math from UC Berkeley. He is a recipient of the IEEE Baker Prize for the “top 10 most influential papers in mathematics 1981-1993” as well as numerous other awards and paper prizes.

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Paulo Ferrão

speaker photoProfessor Paulo Manuel Cadete Ferrão is the Portugal Director for the MIT Portugal Program (MPP), a multi-year collaboration between MIT and the government of Portugal that seeks to address social and economic challenges facing Portugal and the wider world by developing first-of-their-kind research and education programs based on engineering systems, as well as intensive collaborations with industry.

In addition to the MPP, Professor Ferrão directs the Center for Innovation, Technology and Policy Research at Instituto Superior Técnico (IST), the Technical University of Lisbon, where he teaches courses in energy and environment and development policies for economic growth.  

Professor Ferrão is co-author of Industrial Ecology and Food Packaging in Portugal (2005), The Portuguese Automotive Industry: Exploring New Paths and the Challenge of Auto Interiors (2004); and Industrial Ecology and the Automobile in Portugal (2000). He is author of Introduction to Environmental Management: Life Cycle Assessment (1998).

Professor Ferrão, who is a member of the Executive Committee of the FENCO ERA-NET—an EU network of national R&D activities on fossil fuel energy conversion and CO2 capture and storage—received his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from IST.

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Paul S. Fischbeck

Speaker photoPaul S. Fischbeck is Professor of Engineering and Public Policy and Social and Decision Science at Carnegie Mellon University. His general research involves normative and descriptive risk analysis, in which he applies the tools of decision analysis and behavioral social science to policy problems, paying particular attention to the quantification and communication of uncertainty. This work covers both theoretical improvements to decision analysis and numerous applied real world problems.

Past and current research includes the development of a risk index to prioritize inspections of offshore oil production platforms, an engineering and economic policy analysis of air pollution from international shipping, a large-scale probabilistic risk assessment of the space shuttle's tile protection system, and a series of expert elicitations involving a variety of topics including environmental policy selection, travel risks, and food safety.

As Director of the Carnegie Mellon’s Center for the Study and Improvement of Regulation (CSIR), Prof. Fischbeck is coordinating a diverse research group exploring all aspects of regulation from historical case studies to transmission-line siting to emissions-trading programs. His collaborators include researchers from all the engineering disciplines and the social sciences. He has served on five National Academy panels investigating a variety of risk assessments (school buses to offshore oil platforms to double hull oil tankers) and has chaired an NSF panel on Urban Interactions. He is also the co-founder of the Brownfield center at Carnegie Mellon, an interdisciplinary research group investigating ways to improve industrial site reuse. A 2002 book, Improving Regulation (RFF Press, co-edited with Scott Farrow), presents a dozen case studies of how to integrate insights from multiple disciplines to improve the regulatory process.

Prof. Fischbeck received his B.S. in architecture from the University of Virginia, his M.S. in operations research from the Naval Postgraduate School, and his Ph.D. in industrial engineering/engineering management from Stanford University. He has been on the faculty of Carnegie Mellon since 1990.

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Arthur Gelb

Moderator photoArthur Gelb is the retired co-founder, chairman and CEO of TASC (The Analytic Sciences Corp.) and president of Four Sigma Corp.

Gelb earned the Sc.D. in instrumentation (systems engineering) from MIT after receiving the B.E.E. degree from City College of New York in 1968 and a master's degree from Harvard in 1969. He co- founded TASC in 1966, serving as its president, CEO and chair from 1966-91, when TASC was acquired by Primark Corp. TASC activities range from advanced navigation, guidance and communication systems for national defense to civilian weather data distribution and power utility software. Gelb is also president of Four Sigma, which develops mathematical, computer-based trading methods for financial markets.

Gelb, an MIT Life Sustaining Fellow, has been a member of the MIT Corporation since 1995 (and was elected a Life Member in 2002), and served on its Executive Committee from 1997-99. He was chair of the advisory boards for the Center for Technology, Policy and Industrial Development from 1987-98 and Lincoln Laboratory since 1998. Gelb currently chairs the Visiting Committee for the Engineering Systems Division, and serves on committees for the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, and the Media Laboratory/MAS program.

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Mary L. Good

speaker photoDr. Mary L. Good is the Donaghey University Professor at the University of Arkansas, Little Rock. Peviously Dr. Good served four years as the Under Secretary for Technology for the Technology Administration in the Department of Commerce, a Presidentially-appointed, Senate-confirmed, position. The Technology Administration is the focal point in the federal government for assisting U.S. Industry to improve its productivity, technology and innovation in order to compete more effectively in global markets. In addition to her role as Under Secretary for Technology, Dr. Good chaired the National Science and Technology Council's Committee on Technological Innovation (NSTC/CTI), and served on the NSTC Committee on National Security.

Before joining the Administration, Dr. Good was the senior vice-president of technology at Allied Signal, Inc. She was a member of the Management Committee and responsible for technology transfer and commercialization support for new technologies. Dr. Good's accomplishments in industrial research management are the achievements of a second career, having moved to an industrial position after more than 25 years of teaching and research in the Louisiana State University system. Before joining Allied Signal, she was professor of chemistry at the University of New Orleans and professor of materials science at Louisiana State University, where she achieved the university's highest professional rank, Boyd Professor.

Dr. Good was appointed to the National Science Board by President Carter in 1980 and again by President Reagan in 1986. She was Chairman of that Board from 1988 until 1991, when she received an appointment from President Bush to become a member of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST). She is an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering, a past president of the American Chemical Society, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the American Institute of Chemists and the Royal Society of Chemistry. She has been active on the boards of directors of such groups as the Industrial Research Institute, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, and the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research. She has also served on advisory panels for the National Research Council, the National Bureau of Standards, the National Science Foundation Chemistry Section, the National Institute of Health, and NASA, and on the executive committee for the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry.

Dr. Good has received numerous awards for public service as well as her academic work, and holds many honorary degrees. She received her B.S. in chemistry from the University of Central Arkansas and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in inorganic chemistry from the University of Arkansas.

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Daniel Hastings

moderator photoDaniel Hastings is Professor of Engineering Systems and Aeronautics and Astronautics and Dean for Undergraduate Education at MIT. He earned a Ph.D. and an S.M, from MIT in Aeronautics and Astronautics in 1980 and 1978 respectively, received a B.A. in Mathematics from Oxford University in England in 1976. He joined the MIT faculty as an assistant professor in 1985, advancing to associate professor in 1988 and full professor in 1993. Dr. Hastings served ESD as Associate Director from July 2001 to April, 2003, Co-Director from May, 2003 to June, 2004, and Director from July 2004 to December 2005.

As Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Engineering Systems, Dr. Hastings has taught courses and seminars in plasma physics, rocket propulsion, advanced space power and propulsion systems, aerospace policy, technology and policy, and space systems engineering.

Dr. Hastings served as chief scientist to the U.S. Air Force from 1997 to 1999. In that role, he served as chief scientific adviser to the chief of staff and the secretary and provided assessments on a wide range of scientific and technical issues affecting the Air Force mission. He led several influential studies on where the Air Force should invest in space, global energy projection, and options for a science and technology workforce for the 21st century.

Dr. Hastings’ recent research has concentrated on issues of space systems and space policy, and has also focused on issues related to spacecraft-environmental interactions, space propulsion, space systems engineering, and space policy. He has published many papers and a book in the field of spacecraft-environment interactions and several papers in space propulsion and space systems. He has led several national studies on government investment in space technology.

Dr. Hastings is a Fellow of the AIAA and a member of the International Academy of Astronautics. He is serving as a member of the National Science Board, the Applied Physics Lab Science and Technology Advisory Panel, as well as the chair of Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. He is a member of the MIT Lincoln Laboratory Advisory Committee and is on the Board of Trustees of the Aerospace Corporation. He has served on several national committees on issues in National Security Space. Dr. Hastings was elected as a Fellow of INCOSE (the International Council on System Engineering) in June 2007.

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Manuel Heitor

speaker photoProf. Manuel Heitor is Secretary of State for Science, Technology and Higher Education in Portugal. Manuel Heitor is also Professor of the Department of Mechanical Engineering of Instituto Superior Técnico (IST – the engineering school of the Technical University of Lisbon) as well as cofounder and current director of the IST´s “Center for Innovation, Technology and Policy Research.”

Prof. Heitor graduated in 1981 in Mechanical Engineering from IST and carried out his studies in the Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine of the University of London in the area of Fluid Mechanics and Combustion, where in 1985 he obtained his Doctorate degree. He was appointed Assistant Professor (1986) of the Department of Mechanical Engineering of IST, Associate Professor (1991) and Full Professor (1995). He is co-editor of several books (CombustingFlow Diagnostics, Kluwer Acad. Publ., 1992; Unsteady Combustion, Kluwer Acad. Publ., 1996) and author of several scientific papers in the area of experimental combustion and related energy aspects. He was President of the Portuguese Section of the Combustion Institute during the period 1995-2002.

His present research interests include the management of technology and the development of engineering and innovation policies and engineering design. In 1999 he was appointed National Coordinator of the Evaluation of Research Units by the Portuguese Minister of Science and Technology, and has coordinated the evaluation of the Mechanical Engineering panel in 1996. In 2000, under the Portuguese Presidency of the European Union, he chaired the international Conference on “Towards a learning society : Innovation and competence building with social cohesion for Europe.”

Prof. Heitor has served as Deputy-President of Instituto Superior Técnico, Technical University of Lisbon, for the period 1993-1998. He his co-author of New Ideas for the University (in Portuguese), and has published several technical papers in the area of higher education policy. His research work includes publications in the area of the management of technology and the development of engineering and innovation policies and engineering design. Since 1995, he has been Research Fellow of the IC2 Institute, Innovation, Creativity and Capital, the University of Texas at Austin. He is member of the Advisory Board of “Technological Forecasting and Social Change” and the “Intl. Journal of Technology, Policy and Management,” where he has served as guest editor for several special issues. He chaired during the period 1996-2005 the Organizing Committee of the series of International Conferences on “Technology Policy and Innovation.” He his co-editor of the book series on Technology Policy and Innovation. In the area of engineering design, he has published The Glass Chair, and Collaborative Design and Learning: Competence Building for Innovation. Manuel Heitor was the founding director of the ISTs “Center for Innovation, Technology and Policy Research.” He has launched the ISTs M.Sc. Programmes on “Engineering Policy and Management of Technology” (1998) and on “Engineering Design” (2002), as well as the “IST DesignStudio”, (2002). He was appointed in 1999 National Coordinator of the Evaluation of Research Units by the Portuguese Minister of Science and Technology, and has coordinated the evaluation of the Mechanical Engineering panel in 1996. He was co-founder in 2002 of “Globelics - the global network for the economics oflearning, innovation, and competence building systems”, and has worked until 2005 as member of its Scientific Board and co-Director of the “Globelics Academy – PhD School on Systems of Innovation and Economic Development.” Manuel Heitor was appointed Secretary of State for Science, Technology and Higher Education for theGovernment of Portugal in March 2005.

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Paulien Minke Herder

speaker photoPaulien Minke Herder is an associate professor in the Energy & Industry (E&I) group at the Delft University of Technology. Her research interests concern the design and the design process of large-scale networked systems, with a focus on:

        • Engineering design, in particular chemical process design (operability, controllability, flexibility, safety)
        • Life cycle considerations in design (sustainability, life cycle cost)
        • Design process and knowledge management (concurrent engineering, collaboration, communication)
        • Design and Management of Infrastructures (design)

Paulien Herder obtained her M.Sc. degree in Chemical Engineering at the Delft University of Technology in 1994. Her PhD research was aimed at the design and the design process of chemical plants and has been published in her thesis "Process Design in a Changing Environment." During the Ph.D. research she has presented her work at various international conferences, and she has done case studies in three companies. She obtained her Ph.D. degree in 1999.

Following the completion of her PhD, she joined E&I as an assistant professor. She continues to do research in the area of engineering design within E&I, as well as within the Delft University Interfaculty Research Program (DIOC) on "Design and Management of Infrastructures." The design and the design process of large-scale, networked process systems and infrastructures are her main interests, with a focus on engineering design problem formulation and conceptual design. Her work has been published in various national and international refereed journals. She spent several months as a visiting scholar at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) in Pittsburgh, PA during 2000 and 2001.

Paulien was the scientific secretary of the “Delft2001 – Critical Infrastructures” conference and she was in the organizing committee of the Escape-12 conference (European Symposium on Computer Aided Process Engineering). She was co-editor of Critical Infrastructures; State of the Art in Research and Application and she is the programme coordinator for the Delft Spearhead Research Programme on "Design and Management of Multifuntional Infrastructures." Paulien currently is the scientific secretary of the Delft University of Technology Design Platform, and she is an editor of the interdisciplinary refereed scientific Journal of Design Research (JDR). In January 2004 she adopted the functions of Director of Education of TPM (till 2007) and she became executive director of the Next Generation Infrastructures foundation (NGI).

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Susan Hockfield

speaker photoSusan Hockfield has served as the sixteenth president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology since December 2004. A strong advocate of the vital role that science, technology, and the research university play in the world, she believes that MIT can best advance its historic mission of teaching, research, and service by providing robust and sustained support for the ideas and energies of its faculty and students. A noted neuroscientist whose research has focused on the development of the brain, Dr. Hockfield is the first life scientist to lead MIT and holds a faculty appointment as professor of neuroscience in the Institute's Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences.

Dr. Hockfield encourages collaborative work among MIT's schools, departments, and interdisciplinary laboratories and centers to keep the Institute at the forefront of innovation. She believes that MIT's strengths in engineering and science uniquely position the Institute to pioneer newly evolving, interdisciplinary areas and to translate them into practice. Together with MIT's traditions of excellence in architecture and planning, management, and the humanities, arts and social sciences, these strengths will allow the Institute to continue to develop powerful solutions to our era's greatest challenges.

Under her leadership, MIT has launched a major Institute-wide initiative in energy research and education and continues to expand its activities at the intersection of the life sciences and engineering, with a particular focus on cancer research. The Institute has also embarked on a sustained effort to strengthen support for student life and learning, including undergraduate curriculum renewal, and is undertaking major campus construction and renovation projects with a combined value of approximately three-quarters of a billion dollars.

Believing that MIT has a responsibility to help develop new models of teaching and research for a global age, Dr. Hockfield has also worked to extend the university's long tradition of international engagement through initiatives in education and scholarship with partners around the world.
Before assuming the presidency of MIT, Dr. Hockfield was the William Edward Gilbert Professor of Neurobiology and provost at Yale University. She joined the Yale faculty in 1985 and was named full professor in 1994. While at Yale, she played a central role in the university's leadership, first as dean of its Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (1998-2002), with oversight of over 70 graduate programs, and then as provost, the university's chief academic and administrative officer.

Dr. Hockfield's research has focused on the development of the brain and on glioma, a deadly kind of brain cancer. She pioneered the use of monoclonal antibody technology in brain research, leading to her discovery of a protein that regulates changes in neuronal structure as a result of an animal's experience in early life. More recently she discovered a gene and its family of protein products that play a critical role in the spread of cancer in the brain and may represent new therapeutic targets for glioma.

Dr. Hockfield earned her B.A. in biology from the University of Rochester and a Ph.D. from the Georgetown University School of Medicine, while carrying out her dissertation research in neuroscience at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). She has received numerous honorary degrees and other honors and awards. She has served on the National Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke Council of the NIH, as well as a number of other advisory boards. Her memberships in professional societies include the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Society for Neuroscience.

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Roy Kalawsky

speaker photoRoy Kalawsky is Professor of Human-Computer Integration & Systems Engineering and
Director of the Research School of Systems Engineering & Technical Head in the Systems Engineering Innovation Centre at Loughborough University, UK. He also directs the Advanced VR Research Centre.

Dr. Kalawsky’s expertise is in systems engineering, human factors, advanced visualization, and modeling and simulation (including virtual/synthetic environments). His research activities include advanced collaborative environments, advanced scientific visualization, autonomous systems, grid computing, health informatics, human performance evaluation, pervasive computing environments, sensor integration and networks, simulation and modeling, synthetic environments, systems of systems, systems engineering (srchitectures, methodologies, processes and thinking), visualization/advanced 3D techniques, and wearable computing.

He received his BSc (1978), MSc (1984), and PhD (1991), all in electronic engineering from the University of Hull. He was a Senior Systems Engineer at BAE Systems (formally British Aerospace) from 1978 to 1988, Project Leader in Advanced Cockpit Research from 1985 to 1989, Head of Cockpit and Crew Systems Research and Development in the Military Aircraft Division of BAE Systems from 1989 to 1995,and Visiting Professor of Virtual and Synthetic Environment Systems at the University of Hull from 1991 to 1995. He has been a professor at Loughborough University from 1995 to the present.

Dr Kalawsky is a member of the Institution of Electrical Engineers, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, a member of the International Council of Systems Engineers (INCOSE), and is a Chartered Engineer

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Steven Koonin

speaker photoOn March 23 President Obama announced his nomination of Steven Koonin, chief scientist at BP, to the Undersecretary of Science position, which reports to DOE Secretary Steven Chu. Dr. Koonin, a physicist, has focused heavily on alternative energy research since joining BP in 2004.

Until his nomination, Dr. Koonin served as chief scientist of BP, the world’s second largest independent oil company, since 2004. BP refines and markets petroleum products in more than 100 countries and serves more than 13 million customers each day. As chief scientist, Dr. Koonin was responsible for BP’s long-range technology plans and activities, particularly those “beyond petroleum.” He also had purview over BP’s major university research programs around the world and provides technical advice to the company's senior executives.

Koonin joined BP in 2004 following a 29-year career at the California Institute of Technology as a Professor of Theoretical Physics, including a nine-year term as the Institute's Provost. Dr. Koonin is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, as well as a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Trilateral Commission. He has served on numerous advisory bodies for the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the Department of Energy and its various national laboratories. His research interests have included theoretical nuclear, many-body, and computational physics, nuclear astrophysics, and global environmental science. Koonin received his B.S. in physics at Caltech and his Ph.D. in theoretical physics from M.I.T.

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Daniel Krob

speaker photoDaniel Krob is a Senior Researcher at the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) and Professor at Ecole Polytechnique, where he is in charge of the Ecole Polytechnique-Thales teaching and research chair Engineering of Complex Systems. He is a former student of Ecole Normale Supérieure. He received his Ph.D. degree and his second thesis (habilitation) in Computer Science from University Paris 7, respectively, in 1988 and 1991. His research interests cover algebraic and enumerative combinatorics, mobile telecommunications, formal languages theory, system modeling, information systems, theoretical computer science, and theoretical marketing. Nowadays his research focuses on formal modeling of complex systems.

He is the Author of around 80 scientific papers, four books, and two patents. He directed two main national research groups (involving around 100 French research teams) at the border between mathematics and computer science. He was Founder and Head of the “Laboratoire d'Informatique Algorithmique Fondements et Applications” (CNRS & University Paris 7) during six years, before joining Ecole Polytechnique. He was also First Editor-in-Chief of the scientific international e-journal “Discrete Mathematics & Theoretical Computer Science” and Head of the steering committees of two main international scientific conferences (FPSAC and STACS).

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David H. Lehman

speaker photoDavid H. Lehman is senior vice president and general manager of The MITRE Corporation's Command and Control Center (C2C). Mr. Lehman oversees the Center's work and business operations for its Department of Defense (DoD) sponsors and its efforts to create a joint command, control, and communications system.

Before assuming his current position in 2006, Mr. Lehman was MITRE's senior vice president for information and technology. In this role, he was responsible for the formulation and management of the corporation's technology program and corporate information infrastructure and its continuous enhancement through technology. Mr. Lehman also served as vice president and chief technology officer from 1997 to 2001. He has 30 years of experience in the intelligence community, the U.S. imagery system, and information management systems.

Formerly, Mr. Lehman was technical director of MITRE's Intelligence and Special Projects Division. He supported the Intelligence Directorate of the Electronic Systems Center at Hanscom AFB as it acquired intelligence training systems, tactical imagery and information systems, and electronic support measures. In this position, and in his prior position as associate technical director of the same division, he provided systems engineering, systems acquisition, and expertise in enabling technologies to a wide variety of MITRE's command, control, and intelligence customers. Earlier, Mr. Lehman was department head of the Imagery Systems Department.

He briefly left MITRE from 1984 to 1985 to be a product manager for the newly formed Federal Systems Division of Data General Corporation. Prior to this, he ran several research projects at MITRE before becoming involved in the beginning of the National Photographic Interpretation Center work. From 1974 to 1978, he had two site assignments, one in Germany and one at Ft. Meade, Md. He joined MITRE in 1974 as an associate member of the technical staff working as a programmer on intelligence applications.

He is a member of the Army/Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Army/DARPA) Senior Advisory Group and a member of the Board of Directors of the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) International.

Mr. Lehman received a bachelor's in geology from Williams College in 1974.

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Christopher L. Magee

moderator photoChristopher L. Magee is the Director of the Center for Innovation in Product Development and a Professor of the Practice of Engineering Systems and Mechanical Engineering all at MIT. He has held these positions since January 2002. Prior to this, Dr. Magee had 35 years of experience at Ford Motor Company ranging from early research and technology implementation work to later executive positions in Product Development emphasizing vehicle systems and program initiation activities.

Dr. Magee has a Ph.D. in Metallurgy & Materials Science from Carnegie Mellon University and a MBA from Michigan State University. Professor Magee’s current research focuses on the innovation and change process in complex systems. His teaching subjects include product development, complex system modeling and systems engineering. He has been a participant on major National Research Council Studies whose topics span Design Research to Materials Research. Dr. Magee is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of ASM and a Ford Technical Fellow.

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Joel Moses

moderator photoDr. Joel Moses holds a Ph.D., which he received from MIT in 1967. He has served as MIT’s Provost, Dean of Engineering, Head of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Associate Head of EECS, and Associate Director of the Laboratory for Computer Science. Dr. Moses served as ESD's Acting Director from December, 2005 through November, 2007.

Dr. Moses is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, the Association for Computing Machinery, and of the IEEE. He led the development of the Macsyma system for algebraic formula manipulation and is the co-developer of the Knowledge-Based Systems concept in Artificial Intelligence. His current interests include the complexity and flexibility of engineering systems, algebraic formula manipulation, and knowledge-based systems.

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Yoshiaki Ohkami

speaker photoProf. Yoshiaki Ohkami is professor in the Keio University Graduate School of System Design and Management and Professor emeritus at the Tokyo Institute of Technology. He currently leads Keio University’s System Design and Management Program. Keio’s SDM program was inspired by, and is closely patterned after, MIT’s System Design and Management Program. Similar to MIT’s SDM, Keio’s graduate curriculum follows the "V" model of systems engineering. In the early part of the program (on the left side of the "V") students are immersed in systems architecting and system design. The latter part focuses on effective management of large scale systems and projects as well as on operations (on the right side of the "V"). An important part of Keio’s program is not only technology, but also concurrent consideration of the management and social aspects of innovation. The program’s vision is to provide a "melting pot forum for fusion of different generations, fields, social status regardless of educational background."

Prof. Ohkami maintains strong ties to MIT, where he spent the 2005/2006 academic year as a visiting professor in the Field Robotics Laboratory in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, hosted by Prof. Steven Dubowsky. He received his undergraduate degree from Waseda University, and earned his Masters degree (1965) and PhD (1968) in the Division of Science and Engineering at Tokyo Institute of Technology. He is the author of numerous books and academic papers in space science and technology.

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Elisabeth Paté-Cornell

speaker photoElisabeth Paté-Cornell was born in Dakar, Senegal. Her undergraduate degree is in mathematics and physics (BS, Marseilles, France, 1968), and her first graduate degrees are in applied mathematics and computer science (MS and Engineer Degree, Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, France, 1970; 1971).

In 1971 she came to study and live in the United States, where she has been a citizen since 1986. She received a Masters degree in Operations Research (OR) in 1972 and a Ph.D. in Engineering-Economic Systems (EES) in 1978, both from Stanford University. She joined the Stanford faculty in 1981, where she became Professor (in 1991) and then Chair (in 1997) in the Department of Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management (IEEM). In 1999, she was named the Burt and Deedee McMurtry Professor in the School of Engineering at Stanford University. She is presently Professor and Chair of the Department of Management Science and Engineering, as well as a Senior Fellow (by courtesy) of the Stanford Institute for International Studies.

Dr. Paté-Cornell oversaw from 1999, the merger of two Stanford departments of the School of Engineering (EES-OR and IEEM) to form a new department of Management Science and Engineering, which she has led since its formation in 2000. She has served for several years as a member of the Stanford Academic Senate, and she is currently the chair of the Stanford Committee on Research.

Dr. Paté-Cornell was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1995, and is currently a member of its Council. She has served on the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board from December 2001 to December 2004. She is currently a member of the Advisory Council of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory since 2002, and the Board of Trustees of the Aerospace Corporation since December 2004. She chairs the Board of Advisors of the Naval Postgraduate School on which she has served since 1998. She has also served as a member of the Army Science Board, of the NASA Advisory Council and of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. She was elected to the French Académie des Technologies in 2003.

Dr. Paté-Cornell is a world leader in research related to engineering risk analysis, risk management, decision analysis under uncertainty, and more generally, the use of Bayesian probability to process incomplete information. In recent years, her research and that of her Engineering Risk Research Group at Stanford have focused on the inclusion of both technical and organizational factors in probabilistic risk analysis models. These models have been applied to a wide variety of topics, ranging from the risk management of the NASA shuttle tiles to that of offshore oil platforms and medical systems such as anesthesia during surgery. She is currently working on risk management processes for complex projects and programs, with application to space, industrial and medical systems. Since 2001, she has applied risk analytic methods to the study of different types of terrorist attacks on the United States, the assessment of intelligence information and the effectiveness of counter measures.

Dr. Paté-Cornell is a past president (1995) and a fellow of the Society for Risk Analysis, and a fellow of the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS). She has been a consultant to industrial firms and government organizations, including, recently, the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. She is the author or co-author of more than a hundred papers in refereed journals and conference proceedings.

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Thomas W. Peterson

speaker photoIn September of 2008, the National Science Foundation named Thomas W. Peterson as the new Assistant Director of Engineering. Dr. Peterson had been dean of The University of Arizona's College of Engineering since 1998.

The NSF Directorate of Engineering provides support for the nation's engineering research activities and is a force behind the training and development of the U.S. engineering workforce.
Its $640 million budget supports fundamental research, the creation of cutting edge facilities and tools, broad interdisciplinary collaborations, and through its centers and Small Business Innovation Research program, enhances the competitiveness of U.S. companies.

Dr. Peterson headed the chemical and environmental engineering department at the UA from 1990 to 1998, and led the merger of those two programs. During that period the department was home to the first Engineering Research Center in Arizona. The center was supported by NSF and the Semiconductor Research Corporation and focused on environmentally benign semiconductor manufacturing methods.

As dean of the College of Engineering, Peterson initiated or continued the support of several interdisciplinary programs between engineering and other colleges on campus. These included undergraduate programs in optical science and engineering, engineering management and biosystems engineering with the colleges of Optical Sciences, Eller College of Management and Agriculture and Life Sciences, along with graduate programs in biomedical engineering and the management of technology with the College of Medicine and Eller.

Peterson has also been the vice chair of the Engineering Deans Council of the American Society for Engineering Education. He was one of the founding members of the Global Engineering Deans Council and has made global education experiences a high priority for engineering students at Arizona.

He graduated from Tufts University with a Bachelor of Science degree, and has a master of science degree from UA and a doctorate from the California Institute of Technology

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John Shepard Reed

speaker photoIn April 2000, Mr. Reed retired after a thirty-five year career with Citibank, Citicorp and Citigroup. He was elected Chairman and CEO of Citicorp and Citibank in September 1984. Citicorp merged with the Travelers Company in October 1998, subsequently he served as Chairman and Co-CEO of the new company: Citigroup.

Mr. Reed served as Chairman of the New York Stock Exchange from September 2003 until April 2005.

Mr. Reed was born in Chicago in 1939. He was raised in Argentina and Brazil, where his father was an executive with Armour and Co.

Mr. Reed studied at Washington & Jefferson College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a joint-degree program earning both the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in 1961. He returned to MIT to earn a Master of Science from the Sloan School in 1965, after a year as a trainee with The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., in Akron, Ohio, and two years as an officer in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Mr. Reed is a member of the Corporation of MIT. Mr. Reed is a Trustee of MDRC, a Board member of the NBER and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Philosophical Society.

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Daniel Roos

speaker photoDr. Daniel Roos, Japan Steel Industry Professor of Engineering Systems and Civil and Environmental Engineering, currently serves as Director of the MIT Portugal Program, which is a five-year, $40 million initiative focusing on engineering systems. The program involves over 40 MIT faculty from all five schools at MIT.

Dr. Roos was the Founding Director of MIT’s Engineering Systems Division (ESD) from 1998–2004 and serves as Chair of the Engineering Systems University Council, an organization of universities with Engineering Systems programs.

Previous MIT responsibilities for Dr. Roos include serving as Director of the MIT Center for Transportation Studies, and Director of the MIT Center for Technology, Policy and Industrial Development. Dr. Roos also served as Special Assistant to the MIT Chancellor and Provost, helping to form large-scale industrial and global partnerships. He had a leadership role in partnerships with Ford, Merrill Lynch, and Cambridge University in the U.K.

Dr. Roos was Founding Director of the International Motor Vehicle Program (IMVP) and currently serves as Chair of the IMVP Advisory Board. He is co-author of The Machine that Changed the World, which has been published in 11 languages and has sold over 600,000 copies. Dr. Roos received the Shingo Prize for Excellence in Manufacturing Research and the Frank M. Masters Transportation Engineering Award from the American Society of Civil Engineers "for his 25 year professional career in directing a series of highly innovative research projects of great relevance in the advancement of urban transportation.”

Dr. Roos has performed extensive consulting assignments around the world for government and industry. He served for 11 years as consultant to the World Economic Forum helping to organize and run the annual Auto Governors Meeting at the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos Switzerland. The Governors meeting is attended by 30 automotive CEOs.

Dr. Roos has chaired and served on numerous committees of the National Research Council including chairing the first National Academy study of intelligent transportation systems, as National Lecturer with the Association of Computing Machinery; and as an officer with the Transportation Research Board, Operations Research Society of America, American Society of Civil Engineers, ITS America, and Council of University Transportation Centers.

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William Rouse

moderator photoWilliam Rouse is the Executive Director of the Tennenbaum Institute at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is also a professor in the College of Computing and School of Industrial and Systems Engineering. Prof. Rouse has written hundreds of articles and book chapters, and has authored many books, including most recently People and Organizations: Explorations of Human-Centered Design (Wiley, 2007), Essential Challenges of Strategic Management (Wiley, 2001) and the award-winning Don’t Jump to Solutions (Jossey-Bass, 1998). He is editor of Enterprise Transformation: Understanding and Enabling Fundamental Change (Wiley, 2006), co-editor of Organizational Simulation: From Modeling & Simulation to Games & Entertainment (Wiley, 2005), co-editor of the best-selling Handbook of Systems Engineering and Management (Wiley, 1999, 2008), and editor of the eight-volume series Human/Technology Interaction in Complex Systems (Elsevier).

Among many advisory roles, he has served as Chair of the Committee on Human Factors of the National Research Council, a member of the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, and a member of the DoD Senior Advisory Group on Modeling and Simulation. Prof. Rouse is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, as well as a fellow of four professional societies - Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE), the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science, and the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. He has received the Joseph Wohl Outstanding Career Award and the Norbert Wiener Award from the IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society; a Centennial Medal and a Third Millennium Medal from IEEE; the Best Article Award from INCOSE, and the O. Hugo Schuck Award from the American Automation Control Council.

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Stan Settles

moderator photoStan Settles holds the IBM Chair in Engineering Management, is the Director of the Systems Architecture and Engineering Program, C-director of the Center for Systems and Software Engineering, Director of the Engineering Management Program, and former Chair of the Daniel J. Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the University of Southern California. His research and teaching interests are in the areas of quality management, engineering project management, and manufacturing systems engineering.

Prior to his USC roles he served as Program Director for Design and Integration Engineering at the National Science Foundation. Dr. Settles was on loan to the NSF from Arizona State University in Tempe, where he was a Research Professor in the Department of Industrial and Management Systems Engineering. In 1992 and 1993 he served as Assistant Director for Industrial Technology in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

Dr. Settles had a 30-year career with AlliedSignal Aerospace (now Honeywell), primarily in Phoenix, Arizona. He held a number of positions in design and project engineering, manufacturing, and general management.

Dr. Settles is a fellow and past president of the Institute of Industrial Engineers, a fellow of the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science, a member of the American Society for Engineering Education, the IEEE/Engineering Management Society/Systems Man & Cybernetics, and the International Council on Systems Engineering.

Dr. Settles was honored by election to the National Academy of Engineering in 1991. Dr. Settles served as the chair of the National Research Council’s Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design. He now serves on the committee that oversees the Division of Engineering and Physical Sciences of the National Academies. The USC School of Engineering honored him with its Faculty Service Award for 2001 his contributions to many aspects of society.

He earned his M.S.E. and Ph.D. in industrial engineering from Arizona State University. He holds B.S. degrees in both industrial engineering and production technology from LeTourneau University.

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Yossi Sheffi

speaker photoDr. Yossi Sheffi became Director of MIT's Engineering Systems Division, effective Nov. 15, 2007

Dr. Sheffi holds a dual appointment at MIT at the Civil and Environmental Engineering and at the Engineering Systems Division. He also serves as Director of the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics. He is an expert in systems optimization, risk analysis and supply chain management, which are the subjects he teaches and researches at MIT. He is the author of dozens of scientific publications and two books: a textbook on transportation networks optimization and the recently published business best-seller The Resilient Enterprise: Overcoming Vulnerability for Competitive Advantage (MIT Press, October 2005). The Resilient Enterprise got rave reviews from dozens of trade publications as well as from the NYT, WSJ, and The Economist. The Financial Times chose it as one of the best business books of 2005. It was also awarded the “2005 Book of the Year” in the category of Business and Economics by ForeWord Magazine.

Under his leadership, the Center launched many new educational, research, and industry/government outreach programs, leading to substantial growth. He is the director of MIT's Master of Engineering in Logistics (MLOG) degree which he founded and launched in 1998. In 2003 he launched the MIT-Zaragoza program, building a new logistics university in Spain based on a unique international academia, government and industry partnership.

Outside the university Professor Sheffi has consulted with numerous governments and leading manufacturing, retail and transportation enterprises all over the world. He is also an active entrepreneur, having founded five successful companies, and a sought-after speaker in corporate and professional events.

Dr. Sheffi was recognized in numerous ways in academic and industry forums and was on the cover of Purchasing Magazine and Transportation and Distribution Magazine. In 1997 he won the Distinguished Service Award given by the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals. In 2002/03 he was on sabbatical in the Judge Institute of Management in Cambridge University, UK. He is also a life fellow of Cambridge University’s Clare Hall College.

He obtained his B.Sc. from the Technion in Israel in 1975, his S.M. from MIT in 1977, and Ph.D. from MIT in 1978.

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Robert E. Skinner, Jr.

speaker photoRobert E. Skinner, Jr. has been the Executive Director of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering since 1994. TRB is a non-profit organization that promotes transportation innovation by sponsoring professional meetings and publications, administering applied research programs, and conducting policy studies. It serves as an independent adviser to the federal government and others on scientific and technical questions of national importance.

The staff director for congressionally mandated studies. He has overseen studies on a diverse range of topics including highway design, highway safety, truck size and weight regulations, high-speed passenger rail, maritime transportation policies, and airline deregulation.

Prior to joining TRB in 1983, Mr. Skinner was a Vice President of Alan M. Voorhees and Associates, a transportation consulting firm, for which he managed the firm's activities in the eastern United States


Mr. Skinner earned his bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the University of Virginia in 1969 with high distinction. He earned a master’s degree in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1971. A registered professional engineer, Mr. Skinner received the James Laurie Prize from the American Society of Civil Engineers.

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Henk G. Sol

moderator photoProf.dr. Henk G. Sol, born in 1951, graduated in 1974 "cum laude" from the University of Groningen, The Netherlands, with a MSc in Operations Research and Information Systems. He obtained a Ph.D. "cum laude" from the University of Groningen on the subject of ‘Simulation in Information Systems Development’ in 1982.

He was involved in the development and control of a Masters Program in Information Systems within the School of Economics and Management Science of the University of Groningen from 1974 to 1984. Prof. Sol became a chaired professor of ‘Information Systems Development’ at Delft University of Technology in 1984, where he developed the Department of Information Systems to one of the leading Information Engineering Schools in Europe. From 1992 – 1998 he was founding Dean of the new School for Engineering, Policy Analysis and Management. He prepared the merger, in 1998, into the Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management.

In 1992 Prof. Sol was appointed as Chaired Professor of ‘Systems Engineering’ at Delft University of Technology. In 1999 Prof.Sol was appointed as Scientific Director of Delft Institute for Information Technology in Service Engineering and of the Airport Development Center. From 2000 tot 2003 Prof.Sol was again Dean of the Faculty of Technology, Policy & Management and Chaired Professor of Systems Engineering, in particular Business Engineering and ICT.

His research focuses on the development of services enabled by ICT, management information systems, decision support systems and telematics. Currently his research interest shifts towards designing information-intensive, innovative organizations. He is a well-known author with a few hundred publications in these fields.

He serves on the editorial roles with journals such as Decision Support Systems, Electronic Journal of E-commerce, Organizational Science, Communications of AIS and Information and Management.

He is member of IFIP TC 8, W.G. 8.1, 8.2, 8.4 and various other professional organizations. He received the IFIP Outstanding Service Award as well as the IFIP Silver Core. He is one of the founding fathers of AIS and one of its first vice-presidents.

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Heinz Stoewer

speaker photoProfessor Heinz Stoewer holds advanced degrees in technical physics, economics and systems management from German and US Universities. Since 1962 he worked in various systems, project and management positions in German and US industry (Boelkow/EADS and MDAC/Boeing), In 1973 he joined the Technical Centre of the European Space Agency (ESA) as the first Programme Manager Spacelab and later founded the Agency's Systems Engineering and Programmatics Department. In 1990 he became Managing Director Progammes of the newly created German Space Agency (DARA GmbH).

Additional functions included member- and chairmanships in various international technical and policy boards in, e.g. joint ESA/NASA Spacelab boards, ESA Programme Board for Earth Observation and Meteorology and ESA Council, joint German/Italian Radar Directors Board, the German Aerospace Society (DGLR) Board of Directors, Committee on Earth Observation (CEOS), and European Union Space Advisory Group. In 1986 he was appointed Professor for Space Systems Engineering and later founding Director of the acclaimed International Postgraduate Space Systems Engineering "SpaceTech" Programme at Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.

After retirement from DARA, Prof. Stoewer founded the Space Associates GmbH, a company consulting internationally on space systems, education and strategic topics. He is a member of the governing boards of the German OHB Technology AG and the Netherlands Space Research Organization (SRON), of the Senate of the German Aerospace Society, the Dutch Aerospace Establishment (NLR) Systems and Applications Advisory Committee and of an advisory committee of the Italian Finmeccanica/SELEX company. He is EADS Scientific Advisor on Systems Engineering and chairs several EADS systems and executive training related boards. He is a Fellow and Past President of the International Council for Systems Engineering (INCOSE), emeritus member of the Board of Trustees of the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) and a past chair of its Engineering Sciences Section. He is a member of several international journals editorial boards, lectures at universities in Europe and abroad, has authored numerous scientific/technical publications and holds prestigious German and international awards.

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Subra Suresh

speaker photoSubra Suresh is Dean of the School of Engineering and the Ford Professor of Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He holds joint faculty appointments in Materials Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Biological Engineering, and Health Sciences and Technology. He began his tenure as Dean of Engineering in July 2007.

The former head of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Suresh's current research focuses on the mechanical responses of single biological cells and molecules, and the implications of these responses for human health and diseases. His prior and ongoing work has also led to seminal contributions in the area of nano- and micro-scale mechanical properties of engineered materials. He is the author of over 210 research articles in international journals, co-editor of five books, and co-inventor on 14 U.S. and international patents. More than 100 students, post-doctoral associates, and research scientists who trained in his group occupy prominent positions in academe, industry, and government throughout the world. He has authored or co-authored three books: Fatigue of Materials, Fundamentals of Functionally Graded Materials, and Thin Film Materials.

He is the recipient of the 2007 European Materials Medal, the highest honor conferred by the Federation of European Materials Societies, and the 2006 Acta Materialia Gold Medal. In 2006, Technology Review magazine selected Suresh's work on nanobiomechanics as one of the top 10 emerging technologies that "will have a significant impact on business, medicine or culture."

Suresh is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering; the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; the Indian National Academy of Engineering; the Academy of Sciences of the Developing World, TWAS, Trieste, Italy; and the German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. He is also an honorary fellow of the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore, and an honorary member of the Spanish Royal Academy of Sciences. He has been elected a fellow or honorary fellow by all major materials societies in the U.S. and India, including the American Society for Materials International; The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society; the American Society of Mechanical Engineers; the American Ceramic Society; the Indian Institute of Metals; and the Materials Research Society of India.

Suresh received his Bachelor of Technology degree in first class with distinction from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, in 1977; his M.S. from Iowa State University in 1979; and his Sc.D. from MIT in 1981. After conducting post-doctoral research at the University of California, Berkeley, and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, he joined the faculty at Brown University in 1983. He came to MIT in 1993 as the R. P. Simmons Professor of Materials Science and Engineering.

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Francisco Veloso

speaker photoFrancisco Veloso is Associate Professor of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University. His research focuses on technology policy and management, supply chain decisions, and industrial development. Specifically, his work aims at integrating engineering and technology knowledge and methods with economic analysis to study how firms and regions develop technology capabilities. To be able to integrate both dimensions, his work entails both methodology development and problem focus research.

His current work includes a series of studies on how decisions related to technology and innovation (e.g. entry in new technologies, adoption of process improvement methods, or modular product solutions) affect firm performance. This work focuses mostly on the automotive sector and has an important dimension looking at developing and intermediate level economies.

A second and more recent area of research aims at evaluating and comparing technological capabilities of knowledge based industries in developing nations. A current project analyzes the capabilities of the software industry in China, India and Brazil. The methodology development effort of his research has been directed towards the development of a System Cost Model (SCM), a tool to evaluate cost implications of decisions in complex technological systems such as automobiles.

Some of his representative publications include “The Effects of Innovation on Vertical Structure: Perspectives on Transaction Costs and Capabilities” (with C. Wolter, forthcoming in the Academy of Management Review), and “Offshoring Technology Innovation: A Case Study of the Rare-earth Technology,” (with B. Fifarek and C. Davidson, forthcoming in the Journal of Operations Management).

Prof. Veloso received his B.S. from the Instituto Superior Tecnico and his M.S.from the Instituto Superior de Economia e Gestão, both in Portugal. His Ph.D. is in Engineering Systems from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Charles M. Vest

speaker photoKeynote speaker Charles M. Vest is president of the National Academy of Engineering and vice chair of the National Research Council, the principal operating arm of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering. He is also President Emeritus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a past and present member of many government task forces and advisory committees that have helped shape national and international policies on research, science, education, and national security.

Dr. Vest became the fifteenth president of MIT on October 15, 1990. During his 14-year tenure as president, he added a strong international dimension to education and research programs, strengthened relations with industry, increased racial and cultural diversity at MIT, and rebuilt public understanding and support for higher education and research. Prior to assuming the presidency of MIT, Dr. Vest was provost and vice president for academic affairs at the University of Michigan

During his early career in mechanical engineering, his research focused on thermal sciences and the engineering applications of lasers and coherent optics. His pioneering work included the development of techniques to obtain 3-D holographic interferograms of refractive indices in thermal flows. He is the author of numerous papers on these subjects and one book, Holographic Interferometry. He has also written two books on higher education and research.

From 1990 to 1999, Dr. Vest served on the Massachusetts Governor’s Council on Economic Growth and Technology, and in 1993 and 1994 he chaired the President’s Advisory Committee on the Redesign of the Space Station. He has been a member of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology since 1994, and from 2002 to 2003 he chaired the U.S. Department of Energy Task Force on the Future of Science Programs. In February 2004, President Bush appointed him a member of the Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities of the United States Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction (the Robb-Silberman Commission). He was also a member of the Secretary of Education’s Commission on the Future of Higher Education (the Spellings Commission), which issued its report in September 2006, and he is currently a member of the Secretary of State’s Advisory Committee on Transformational Diplomacy and the Rice-Chertoff Secure Borders and Open Doors Advisory Committee.

Dr. Vest was elected a member of NAE in 1993 and served as an NAE councillor from 2005 until his recent election as president. He has also been a member of several NAE, NRC, and National Academies committees, including the authoring committee of the recent influential report, Rising Above the Gathering Storm. In 2000 he was awarded the NAE Arthur M. Bueche Award for “outstanding university leadership, commitment and effectiveness in helping mold government policy in support of research, and forging linkages between academia and industry.”

Dr. Vest is a fellow of the Optical Society of America, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and the Association for Women in Science and a member of Tau Beta Pi, Pi Tau Sigma, and Sigma Xi. Among his most recent awards are the ABET President’s Award from the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology in 2002 and the Phillip Hauge Abelson Award of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2006. He has also received 10 honorary degrees.

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Dinesh Verma

speaker photoDinesh Verma received the Ph.D. and the M.S. in Industrial and Systems Engineering from Virginia Tech. He is currently serving as Dean of the School of Systems and Enterprises and Professor in Systems Engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology. During his six years at Stevens he as successfully proposed research and academic programs exceeding $20m in value. Verma concurrently serves as Scientific Advisor to the Director of the Embedded Systems Institute in Eindhoven, Holland. Prior to this role, he served as Technical Director at Lockheed Martin Undersea Systems, in Manassas, Virginia, in the area of adapted systems and supportability engineering processes, methods and tools for complex system development and integration.

Before joining Lockheed Martin, Verma worked as a Research Scientist at Virginia Tech and managed the University’s Systems Engineering Design Laboratory. While at Virginia Tech and afterwards, Verma continues to serve numerous companies in a consulting capacity, to include Eastman Kodak, Lockheed Martin Corporation, L3 Communications, United Defense, Raytheon, IBM Corporation, Sun Microsystems, SAIC, VOLVO Car Corporation (Sweden), NOKIA (Finland), RAMSE (Finland), TU Delft (Holland), Johnson Controls, Ericsson-SAAB Avionics (Sweden), Varian Medical Systems (Finland), and Motorola. He served as an Invited Lecturer from 1995 through 2000 at the University of Exeter, United Kingdom. His professional and research activities emphasize systems engineering and design with a focus on conceptual design evaluation, preliminary design and system architecture, design decision-making, life cycle costing, and supportability engineering. In addition to his publications, Verma has received two patents and has another pending in the areas of life-cycle costing and fuzzy logic techniques for evaluating design concepts.

Dr. Verma has authored over 85 technical papers, book reviews, technical monographs, and co-authored two textbooks: Maintainability: A Key to Effective Serviceability and Maintenance Management (Wiley, 1995), and Economic Decision Analysis (Prentice Hall, 1998). He is a co-Editor of a forthcoming textbook on space systems engineering. He is a Fellow of the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE), a senior member of SOLE, and was elected to Sigma Xi, the honorary research society of America. He serves as on the Core Curriculum Committee of the Delft University’s Space Systems Engineering Program (Holland) and as an advisor to the Systems Engineering Center of Expertise at the Buskerud University College (Norway). He was honored with an Honorary Doctorate Degree (Honoris Causa) in Technology and Design from Växjö University (Sweden) in January 2007.

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Chelsea C. White

speaker photoChelsea C. White received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan (UM) in 1974 in Computer, Information, and Control Engineering. He has served on the faculties of the University of Virginia (1976- 1990) and UM (1990-2001). He currently is the H.Milton and Carolyn J. Stewart School Chair of the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering and holds the Schneider National Chair of Transportation and Logistics at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he is the Director of the Trucking Industry Program (TIP) and the former Executive Director of The Logistics Institute. He has previously served as department chair of Systems Engineering at the University of Virginia, department chair of Industrial and Operations Engineering at the UM, and Senior Associate Dean at the UM.

He is a member of the International Academic Advisory Committee of the Laboratory of Complex Systems and Intelligence Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, a Fellow of INFORMS, a former member of the Executive Board of CIEADH (Council of Industrial Engineering Academic Department Heads), and the founding chair of the IEEE TAB Committee on ITS (now an IEEE Society).His involvement with the IEEE includes serving as President of the Systems, Man, and Cybernetics (SMC) Society from 1992 through 1993. He received the Norbert Wiener Award in 1999 and the Joseph G.Wohl Outstanding Career Award in 2005, both from the IEEE SMC Society, and an IEEE Third Millennium Medal. The Norbert Wiener Award is the SMC’s highest award recognizing lifetime contributions in research.

Professor White is the former Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, Parts A and C, and was the founding Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). He has served as the ITS Series book editor for Artech House Publishing Company.

He is co-author (with A.P. Sage) of the second edition of Optimum Systems Control (Prentice-Hall, 1977), co-editor (with D.E. Brown) of Operations Research and Artificial Intelligence: Integration of Problem Solving Strategies (Kluwer, 1990), and co-editor (with D.L. Belman) of Trucking in the Information Age (Ashgate, 2005). He has published primarily in the areas of the control of finite stochastic systems and knowledge-based decision support systems. His most recent research interests include analyzing the role of real-time information and enabling information technology for improved logistics and, more generally, supply chain productivity and risk mitigation, with special focus on the U.S. trucking industry.

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Irving Wladawsky-Berger

speaker photoDr. Irving Wladawsky-Berger retired from IBM on May 31, 2007 after 37 years with the company. As Chairman Emeritus, IBM Academy of Technology, he continues to participate in a number of IBM’s technical strategy and innovation initiatives. He is also Visiting Professor of Engineering Systems at MIT, where he is involved in multi-disciplinary research and teaching activities focused on how information technologies are helping transform business organizations and the institutions of society.

At IBM he was responsible for identifying emerging technologies and marketplace developments critical to the future of the IT industry, and organizing appropriate activities in and outside IBM in order to capitalize on them. He was also responsible for IBM’s university relations office and for the IBM Academy of Technology where he served as Chairman of the Board of Governors. In 1996, he led the effort to formulate IBM’s Internet strategy and to develop and bring to market leading-edge Internet technologies that could be integrated into IBM’s mainstream business. He subsequently led a number of companywide initiatives like Linux, Grid Computing and the On Demand Business initiative.

He began his IBM career in 1970 at the Company’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center where he started technology transfer programs to move the innovations of computer science from IBM’s research labs into its product divisions. After joining IBM’s product development organization in 1985, he continued his efforts to bring advanced technologies to the marketplace, leading IBM’s initiatives in supercomputing and parallel computing including the transformation of IBM’s large commercial systems to parallel architectures. He has managed a number of IBM’s businesses, including the large systems software and the UNIX systems divisions.

Dr. Wladawsky-Berger is Adjunct Professor in the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Group at the Imperial College Business School. He is a member of BP’s Technology Advisory Council, the Visiting Committee for the Physical Sciences Division at the University of Chicago and the Board of Visitors for the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. He was co-chair of the President’s Information Technology Advisory Committee, as well as a founding member of the Computer Sciences and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council. He is a former member of the University of Chicago Board of Governors for Argonne National Laboratories and of the Board of Overseers for Fermilab. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. A native of Cuba, he was named the 2001 Hispanic Engineer of the Year.

Dr. Wladawsky-Berger received an M.S. and a Ph. D. in physics from the University of Chicago.

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